Frittata with sausage, onion, and potato

I learned how to make frittata from The Velveteen Rabbi.  Her recipe involves onion, garlic, potato, chorizo or linguica, and eggs layered in a skillet and baked into an egg pie.  It’s endlessly flexible based on what you have around:  Spinach, feta, green onion, potato.  Roasted red pepper, italian sausage, potato, onion, garlic.  Sometimes I like to sprinkle the top with hot Hungarian paprika and fresh chopped flatleaf parsley.

I made one today to break a streak of eating like a sad graduate student, using a sweet/spicy chicken apple sausage, tiny red potatoes, and half a yellow onion.  Complete photos here, recipe after the jump.

Ingredients:

  • 4 small Chicken/Apple/Maple sausages, sliced into thin rounds,
  • A handful of tiny new potatoes, sliced into thin rounds,
  • 1/2 a large onion, chopped,
  • six eggs, lightly beaten,
  • 2-3 ounces of grated cheddar,
  • olive oil, salt, pepper.

Method:

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  • Boil the sliced potatoes until tender.
  • While the potatoes are cooking,  sautee the onions and sausage rounds in a heavy skillet in a little olive oil.
  • Grate some cheddar.
  • Beat 6 eggs in a bowl.
  • Drain the potatoes and sprinkle them with salt and fresh ground black pepper.
  • Add them to the skillet and toss with onions/sausage to combine.
  • Pour the eggs into the skillet, pushing ingredients around until the egg is evenly distributed.  Add a little more fresh-ground pepper.
  • Cook for about 2 minutes, then sprinkle the cheddar on top of the skillet.  You want clumps that will melt into cheddary goodness.
  • Cook for another minute or so, then pop the whole skillet into the oven and bake it for 20 minutes or so or until the eggs firmly set.
  • Cut into slices and serve – serves 4-6 as a hearty, tasty brunch.

Refrigerates & reheats well, even better the second day.

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2 responses to “Frittata with sausage, onion, and potato

  1. Yum. I think I need a large cast iron skillet. We have two small ones (for corn bread), but I’d like a large one for things like this. 🙂

    • It’s a handy tool. Great for making meat or fish, caramelizing onions, roasting potatoes – anything that you want to get a nice crust on when you cook it.

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